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The Cosmic Dark Ages (Free Astronomy Public Lectures)

How did the elements come into existence, and how we can use them to count the number of stars in the early Universe? This talk will reveal the dark ages of the Universe.

Created by: Emma Ryan-Weber
Year: 2010
Format: Audio
Duration: 00:45:05
Collection: Swinburne Commons (Open)
Status: Live|Last updated:21 September 2017 2:05 PM
Relevance: 9.908
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A Night in the Life of an Astronomer (Free Astronomy Public Lectures)

Through a visual journey, you will travel with an astronomer, Dr. Lee Spitler, on an observing trip to the remote 6.5-metre Baade Magellan Telescope. In the still Chilean night, you will collect astronomy data to hunt for galaxies billions of light years away from Earth. Learn about the trials and tribulations of a professional astronomer.

Created by: Lee Spitler
Year: 2012
Format: Audio
Duration: 00:59:16
Collection: Swinburne Commons (Open)
Status: Live|Last updated:21 September 2017 1:23 PM
Relevance: 9.732
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From games to galaxies (Free Astronomy Public Lectures)

Advancements in modern astronomy are increasingly dependent on access to powerful computing facilities. This talk introduces the exciting new world of CPU-powered astronomy, which is taking us from computer games to galaxies.

Created by: Christopher Fluke
Year: 2010
Format: Audio
Duration: 01:03:33
Collection: Swinburne Commons (Open)
Status: Live|Last updated:21 September 2017 2:05 PM
Relevance: 9.732
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From grains to planets (Free Astronomy Public Lectures)

Solar System bodies such as planets, meteorites and comets are all created from small grains during the protoplanetary disk phase. The chemical composition of all these objects is intrinsically related to the chemistry of gas and grains in the parent disk. In the first part of the lecture we will explore the evidence we have to understand grain growth in discs. In the second part of the lecture we will go through the chemistry of discs and how thermodynamics can help us to understand the formation of our Solar System and the bulk composition of exoplanets orbiting stars different from our Sun.

Created by: Catarina Ubach, Francesco Pignatale
Year: 2012
Format: Audio
Duration: 00:44:28
Collection: Swinburne Commons (Open)
Status: Live|Last updated:21 September 2017 1:23 PM
Relevance: 9.556
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Mapping the Universe (Free Astronomy Public Lectures)

Over the last few decades astronomers have made enormous leaps in charting the Universe around us. Now, with accurate positions for millions of galaxies, we are finally able to trace the Cosmic Web in which we live. But these cosmic maps do far more than simply catalogue the contents of our Universe – they can help us to understand its origin and evolution as well as its ultimate fate. Cosmologist Dr Rita Tojeiro takes us on a voyage to the furthest reaches of space and explains how astronomers are unlocking some of the fundamental secrets of the Universe.

Created by: Rita Tojeiro
Year: 2012
Format: Audio
Duration: 00:48:33
Collection: Swinburne Commons (Open)
Status: Live|Last updated:21 September 2017 1:22 PM
Relevance: 9.556
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The Extreme Side of Pulsars (Free Astronomy Public Lectures)

Pulsars are the compact cores of dead stars that periodically flash radio beams at Earth. The regularity of their flashing makes them somewhat like highly accurate clocks--however not all pulsars are very well behaved. This lecture will give a background to pulsar astronomy and detail the extreme behaviours that some of these enigmatic stars exhibit. New, bizarre classes of pulsars are regularly being discovered, and we will present hot-off-the-press discoveries that have been made by an international team of astronomers that includes members of the Swinburne Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing.

Created by: Sarah Burke-Spolaor, Lina Levin
Year: 2010
Format: Audio
Duration: 00:37:47
Collection: Swinburne Commons (Open)
Status: Live|Last updated:21 September 2017 2:05 PM
Relevance: 9.556
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Chasing dead stars (Free Astronomy Public Lectures)

Stars don't shine forever - and especially very massive stars don't live very long before ending their lives as neutron stars or black holes. In this lecture we will focus on the endpoints of the evolution of such massive stars and how a black hole can be formed during a stellar explosion called supernova. We will discuss how black holes of different sizes can be detected under certain circumstances, and implications for theories that stellar-mass black holes could be the seeds of supermassive black holes we find at the centres of galaxies like our Milky Way.

Created by: Anna Sippel
Year: 2013
Format: Audio
Duration: 01:04:42
Collection: Swinburne Commons (Open)
Status: Live|Last updated:21 September 2017 2:06 PM
Relevance: 9.556
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Understanding the Universe (Free Astronomy Public Lectures)

Just over a century ago the fixed stars we see in the night sky were the limit of the entire Universe. The Universe was assumed to be static. Now we have discovered that our Universe is not only expanding but is also accelerating. Galaxies play an important role here. In this talk I will describe how our knowledge about the Universe as a whole is evolving over time with emerging techniques and technologies.

Created by: Syed Uddin
Year: 2013
Format: Audio
Duration: 00:55:17
Collection: Swinburne Commons (Open)
Status: Live|Last updated:21 September 2017 2:05 PM
Relevance: 9.556
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Galaxies and Black Holes (Free Astronomy Public Lectures)

Using exceptional data from Hubble Space Telescope astronomers have discovered supermassive black holes, with masses ranging from millions to billions times the mass of the Sun, at the very centre of massive galaxies. Intriguingly the mass of this central black hole scales with many of the properties of the host galaxy, for example the total mass of the galaxy is about five hundred times the mass of the black hole. However the direct gravitational influence of the black hole extends to only a minute fraction of the volume of the galaxy (about one billionth of the total volume). So, how are these connections established? I will explore this question and reveal an unexpected twist in the story of galaxy evolution. Presented by Prof. Roger Davies on 4 September 2015.

Created by: Roger Davies
Year: 2015
Format: Audio
Duration: 01:01:15
Collection: Swinburne Commons (Open)
Status: Live|Last updated:21 September 2017 2:08 PM
Relevance: 9.467
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The Dynamic Universe (Free Astronomy Public Lectures)

That occasionally new sources (“Stella Nova”) would pop up in the heavens was noted more than a thousand years ago. The earnest study of cosmic explosions began in earnest less than a hundred years ago. Stella Novae are now divided into two major families, novae and supernovae (with real distinct classes in each). Equally the variable stars have a rich phenomenology. Together, supernovae and variable stars have contributed richly to key problems in modern astrophysics: distances to galaxies, cosmography and build up of elements in the Universe. The Palomar Transient Factory (PTF), an innovative 2-telescope system, was designed to explicitly to chart the transient sky with a particular focus on events which lie in the nova-supernova gap.

Created by: Professor Shri Kulkarni
Year: 2012
Format: Audio
Duration: 01:07:46
Collection: Swinburne Commons (Open)
Status: Live|Last updated:21 September 2017 1:22 PM
Relevance: 9.467
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